Tag Archives: Hiring

Negotiating An Offer of Employment

The process of negotiating a job offer between the candidate and client can be one of the toughest tasks that a recruiter will face. One must balance what the candidate feels that they are worth in the market with the client’s budget and concern for internal equity. In many cases, both sides are fairly close, so the offer process goes pretty well and you have both a happy candidate and client. However, in some cases, the candidate may have an unrealistic impression of their worth in the marketplace or the client may not have a realistic idea of what the particular role should pay. In these cases, it is the role of an experienced recruiter to bring both parties to an agreement.

The job of an experienced recruiter is to help educate the candidate by speaking to actual marketplace knowledge of similar searches that you have done in that geographic region. In addition, the client may also offer a strong bonus and benefits package that may offset a base salary that may not meet expectations. The recruiter may also point out that the client offers a stronger career path than the current company does. The job of an experienced recruiter is to get the candidate to focus on the entire package that the client is offering.

At the same time that the recruiter is working to educate the candidate, a similar process may have to be done with the client. In many cases, the company is very concerned about internal equity and base their understanding of what to offer a candidate based on what employees are making in a similar role. However, if they have not hired for this particular role in awhile, the recruiter will need to educate them on the going market rate and what other clients are paying for similar roles. In the case of a client that has never hired a certain position in the past, the client needs to rely of the recruiter to guide them as to what the market is paying.

In the end, if both the candidate and client want the situation to work, an experienced recruiter can be the bridge to make the negotiation of the job offer successful for both parties.

The Value of a Robust LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn has been a tremendous step forward in the evolution of recruiting. From the days of snail-mailed resumes to job boards like Monster and CareerBuilder to LinkedIn, we have seen ability of job seekers to get their background in front of recruiters greatly enhanced. This is especially true for “passive jobseekers” who are generally willing to listen to a targeted job opportunity that seems appealing. The best way to do this is to make sure you have your LinkedIn profile up to date and completely filled out.

Before LinkedIn was developed (and even today), anyone who posted their resume on a job board risked someone at their current company finding out. With a robust LinkedIn profile, you have the opportunity of being approached about a tremendous job opportunity without it being apparent to your company that you would consider other options.

LinkedIn makes it very easy to develop your profile everything from your experience, education, skills & endorsements, publications, and recommendations. You can also attach documents such as your resume.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile, develop one as soon as you can. If you have an existing profile, take the time to update it.

Choosing the Proper Recruiting Model To Assist Your Company with Hiring

Choosing the proper recruiting model to work with your company is not an easy task. Many companies feel that all recruiting models are the same; when in fact there are vast differences. Let’s start with an explanation of the two most common recruiting models:
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How To Attract The Best Talent To Your Company

The key to success in attracting top talent is to make your company an employer of choice. A company must set itself up as a solid, well-organized enterprise and create compelling reasons for top-notch professionals to work there. Those reasons can include excellent compensation and benefits, advancement opportunities, regularly scheduled performance reviews, and other popular perks such as flextime.

Finding the top talent is often a difficult task. Most often, these individuals are not actively seeking new employment. That means companies have to dig deeper to find the top 5 percent. Direct hiring from primary competitors is a company’s best strategy. This involves sophisticated networking and sales ability.

One networking tactic is to determine which of your current employees have already come to you from key competitors. Ask them whom they would recommend hiring from those competitors. Even if a top candidate is ultimately not interested in your position, he or she may be able to refer someone else.

Typically, companies don’t part with top talent. This talent is often well compensated, which makes the stakes higher. In addition, a company will fight to keep them. Therefore, you must be able to offer something that their current employer doesn’t satisfy, such as a new technology or–best of all–a compelling company vision.

Advice To Companies Having Problems Filling Certain Positions

I have seen a lot of companies over the last several years struggle to fill certain positions. Most of these positions tend to be either Information Technology or Engineering related.  With the unemployment rate nearing what the government refers to a “full employment”, it is understandable why filling certain jobs has become a real challenge.

Rather than sit back and hope that the perfect candidate falls into your lap, companies need to look at their sourcing and recruiting methods and processes and determine what needs to change.

1. Are we too strict with our job requirements?

I see this as the main culprit to not filling jobs. Many companies have job descriptions that have requirements that are way too restrictive. Rather than have 7 or 8 MUST have requirements that must be satisfied, re-look at the requirements to see if any of the MUST haves can be converted to NICE TO HAVE.  With a certain amount of training, you could get new hires to the level that you seek.

2. Can we be more flexible with the role?

Many companies today still do not offer employees some work from home flexibility or the ability to perform a role remotely. There is very little cost or downside to offering this flexibility and not having it, puts your company at a major disadvantage to those companies who do offer such flexibility.  Offering this option will also great increase the pool of potential candidates for your roles.

3. Are our salaries competitive?

Because of the slow economic conditions over the last 8 or so years, companies have offered current employees very minimal annual raises.  When they get to the point of hiring again, they are quite shocked to see what certain hard-to-fill roles command in today’s market.  These companies struggle to come up with competitive offers because of concerns with internal equity.  In order to attract star candidates, companies are going to have to make very compelling offers or risk losing the candidates to another companies.

4. Are our benefits competitive?

While base salary and bonus potential seem to be the key components in any job offer, having a competitive benefits package is a close second in priority.  Having a benefits package that is both comprehensive and priced well are very important to landing star candidates.  One area where I see companies struggle is offering competitive vacation or PTO levels to experienced candidates.  It is not realistic to expect an experienced candidate to drop from 3 or 4 weeks vacation back to 2 years vacation.  Companies need to make these candidates “whole” in order to be competitive in today’s employment market.

5. Is our interview process too cumbersome?

In a softer job market, companies could take their time with the hiring process.  This would include multiple phone or onsite interviews as well as extended time between these interviews.  Ina a soft job market, candidates do not have many options and, thus, are compelled to wait.  As the job market heats up, the opportunities for candidates increases, and therefore, companies must speed up the timing of their hiring process in order to capture the star candidates.  Remember, everyone is looking to hire stars, and stars don’t stay on the market very long!

Hopefully, these points will help your company make the changes necessary to improve your hiring rate and fill more jobs.

Updated Job Market Statistics (June 2016)

I updated the analysis (previously done on January 21, 2016 and March 24, 2016) using jobs posted within 100 miles of Philadelphia PA (MAS Recruiting’s office location) and then broke the jobs down by salary level. I gathered my data from jobs posting on Indeed and LinkedIn; two of the most popular job posting sites. Here is the new June analysis and the comparison to January’s and March’s data:

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The comparison data between LinkedIn and Indeed is remarkably similar until you get to the month of June. Up until June, the data showed that between 75% and 80% of all the posted positions are paying 80k or less in salary. The March data also showed that recruiting and hiring has not increased at all since January, and that we remained in a flat job market. However, June’s data from LinkedIn should a large drop in the overall number of jobs, but also showed that total percentage of jobs paying less than 80k dramatically jumped from 77.4% at the end of March to 90% on June 14.

The data from LinkedIn is probably a much better indicator of the health of the overall job market since it cost money to post jobs on the site as compared to Indeed where most of the job postings tend to be free posts. I would imagine that the job totals on Indeed would lag those on LinkedIn.

This data shows that companies continue to be extremely careful with their recruiting and hiring and are willing to add lower salary positions to fill some needs, but will not generally hire higher salaried roles unless absolutely necessary. All of this ties in with what I have seen in my business since Q4 2015. I don’t see the job market getting any better soon since summer tends to be a slower time even in the best of job markets.

Why Companies Are Taking Longer to Hire New Employees

It is a truism of our current hiring climate that employers are taking longer to hire new employees. The average amount of time it took for U.S. companies to say “you’re hired,” from beginning to end of the process was 25 working days on average. The same study showed that bigger companies, defined as those with over 5000 employees, took much longer—58.1 working days on average.

More Jobs
At the same time, this trend of longer hiring periods coincides with the highest number of American job openings in the past seven years—4.7 million according to a June, 2014 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics count. There are still plenty of people looking for work, so we can assume that the lag time isn’t because of a lack of qualified applicants. And so the numbers don’t entirely match up. The picture is a bit perplexing—how confident are employers?

Picky Employers
One partial explanation is that employers have become pickier, raising the requirements or credentials for jobs. These new, higher bars, don’t bode well for many in the job market, like recent college grads who simply don’t have five plus years experience in any field. Yet, some employers are overall happier with the results, once they do get a new hire on the job. By taking more time with the process, they feel they are taking a more active role in curating the social and work culture of their company. Overall satisfaction with those who make it through the more elaborate screening processes seems to be up as well.

A More Elaborate Interview Process
It is a reality these days that job searchers will likely have to go through the gauntlet to get their desired job. Many employers have added multiple interviews for top choices. Future employees may be asked to go through more screening, even drug testing, for jobs which previously didn’t require such tests. Also, the increase in social and business networks online has added to HR’s load in multiple ways. First, when screening an applicant, their online history is usually investigated, and this can be time consuming. Second, many companies are using professional networks like LinkedIn to court and recruit desirable and sometimes over-qualified applicants. This may be happening simultaneously to screening other solicited applications.

Determining Costs
If a company is unsure whether sales and revenue warrant the expense of a new employee, we may see them dragging their feet and prolonging the entire hiring process while they determine whether they can afford to fill the position. Delaying or extending the hiring process may sometimes simply be the direct effect of human resource departments having also suffered cuts during the recession.

Ultimately, however, slower hiring times usually means a loss of revenue for a company. The logic is simple: if they need to hire, it’s because business is good, and they have more clients than they can take on. Prolonging the hiring process can also negatively effect profit.